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Appeal coming in Voter ID ruling

A voter casts a ballot during an election at the De Pere Community Center. (Photo from: FOX 11).
A voter casts a ballot during an election at the De Pere Community Center. (Photo from: FOX 11).

UNDATED (WSAU-Wheeler News)  Wisconsin's attorney general promises to appeal a federal court ruling from yesterday which struck down the state's photo I-D law for voting.

District Judge Lynn Adelman of Milwaukee issued a 70-page decision in which he said there's virtually none of the voter fraud that Republicans claim the law is intended to stop. He also said the 2011 voter I-D law creates what's essentially a "license to vote," saying minorities are more likely to have a cost in time, bother, or out-of-pocket expenses.

Plaintiffs which include the American Civil Liberties Union said many minorities would have had to buy birth certificates to get their I-D's. Those groups praised the ruling, while Republican Assembly Speaker Robin Vos called on the state Senate to approve a modified voter I-D bill his house passed last year. That measure allows people to vote without I-D's if they publicly state that they're poor, and could not get an I-D without a fee -- or if they had religious objections to being photographed. Also, their votes would be singled out in recounts.

Senate G-O-P leader Scott Fitzgerald and Governor Scott Walker's office both said they were reviewing the decision, and weighing their options about possibly bringing the Legislature back into session. Adelman, a former state Senate Democrat, said he would quickly review any changes so they could take effect this fall if they're constitutional.

To restore the original I-D law, both the state and federal courts would have to uphold it. The State Supreme Court is expected to rule this summer on a similar legal challenge.

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